Fran Hall
  There’s something afoot in funeral world. Letters have been pinging into the inbox of funeral directors around the country advising them of a shiny new entrant into the world of undertaking. “Over the next few days you may read about a new funeral company called Hospice Funerals LLP.  It
Fran Hall
Josefine Speyer, wife of the late Nicholas Albery and co-founder and patron of The Natural Death Centre Charity   “Despite the list of contenders for this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award being jam packed with luminaries from the death world, the judges were unanimous in their decision that this year the
Charles Cowling
  Seventy per cent of us want to die at home. This rounded figure was obtained using a methodology which funeral industry practitioners may find strikingly odd: namely, by asking people what they want. It is therefore an informative statistic. If you’re one of the thirty per cent who are happy
Charles Cowling
    Posted by Wendy Coulton   The elephant had well and truly left the room when the first event of its kind about dying matters was held in Plymouth to challenge the taboo which comes with the D word. A positive unexpected outcome came from bringing together likeminded people under
Charles Cowling
  Jeremy Clarkson, writing in the Sunday Times about the death of his Mum: Right in the middle of all that brouhaha about sloping bridges and Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe, my mum died. So there I was, in Russia, in the middle of a Top Gear tour, trying to organise
Charles Cowling
    When the GFG, in conjunction with the Plunkett Foundation, announced a community funerals initiative back in 2012, we supposed that someone might pick it up and run with it. The Plunkett Foundation, far cleverer than us, was pretty confident they would.  They contacted all their community shops and community
Charles Cowling
  “If we want the deaths our lives deserve, we need to start talking about it,” advises a Times leader today. Yes, it’s Dying Matters Awareness week and all Funeralworld is a-flutter with wheezes to “start the conversation” and encourage people to make a will, jot down their end-of-life wishes
Charles Cowling
  First there was Death Café. Then Let’s Have Dinner and Talk About Death. Then Death Salon. Now there’s Die-alogue Cafe Die-alogue Café has been developed by an Australian academic, Stuart Carter. We’ve been talking to Stuart for some time. We like and respect him very much. His purpose is
Charles Cowling
  A letter in last Thursday’s Times tells us something, perhaps, about the evolution of society’s thinking about dying, death, the competition for NHS resources, futile care and the declining value life holds for the ageing and the elderly both in the eyes of society and in their own eyes:
Charles Cowling
  Beau Nash obelisk, Bath Weekends? Ha! We don’t believe in them here at the GFG-Batesville Shard. Probably you don’t, either. Because, like you, I know that the number one regret of the dying is: I wish I had worked harder. So on Sunday, noticing my bank manager had nodded