What constitutes corpse abuse?

Charles Cowling

 

We don’t have abuse of a corpse laws in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, nor Scotland, not like they do in the US. Indeed, the laws around what you can, can’t and must do with a corpse in the UK are few — so few that we’ve never managed to discover what they are. Perhaps you know?

The status of the dead body is the point at issue. A dead body isn’t property, neither is it human. So, for example, no one can rape a dead body, but there is in fact a law which criminalises sexual penetration of a corpse. It’s a different thing, you see?

In the same way, you can’t arrest a corpse for debt.

But what else can’t you do? 

In the US there are state laws which forbid abuse of corpses. They vary from state to state, but in essence they all outlaw two things:

1. treating a corpse in a way which would outrage family sensibilities

2. treating a corpse in a way which would outrage community sensibilities. 

If we had the same sorts of laws in the UK it is conceivable, if the Daily Mail is to be believed, that the outcome of Wednesday’s ITV exposé might have involved the police. 

 

 

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Charles
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I fear quite a lot goes on in the grottier establishments that most people would deem unacceptable. But where are the compliance mechanisms?

I’m still amazed that those Gillman’s staff weren’t arrested and charged. Our dead deserve a higher status.

By the same token, nobody knows just how respectful and excellent the best FDs are — and there are some really, really good ones.

Teresa Evans
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Beg to differ my dear friend Charles. There maybe few laws written into Statute about abusing a “corpse” (insensitive legal term), but dignity and decency including the rights of the bereaved, is protected under common law.