Charles Cowling
  Following on from Tim Clark’s post about grief, I am reminded of a piece by Janice Turner in last week’s Times about the hostile response to Jennifer Saunders’ announcement that she was free of cancer:  She was accused of “slating” survivors and her remark that some wore the disease
Charles Cowling
  Posted by Tim Clark Jenny Uzzell’s excellent GFG posting about the liminal state between death and burial has got me thinking, specifically about grief. Grief is love that has been made homeless; I don’t know where that came from, I first heard it in “Borgen,” the Danish TV political
Charles Cowling
‘Weiland’ (‘Meadow’) – ONE SHOT SHORT from Abel Bos on Vimeo.   It’s a student film, 4 mins 25 seconds. Nice work, psychologically spot on and very nicely acted. 
Charles Cowling
As Jenny Uzell embarks on a series of posts which will consider the knotty question, What Is A Funeral For? it’s worth reflecting on what has been a game of two halves, funeralwise, in the last fortnight. Two people have expressed contrasting approaches to a funeral. First, there was Dave
Charles Cowling
  Film made by Jimmy Edmonds and Jane Harris, nominated for a Good Funeral Award. Beautifully crafted and very, very powerful.
Charles Cowling
  Posted by Kitty My dad died when he was 70. Just a few years earlier, he had been diagnosed with leukaemia. It was my sister who realised that something was wrong. He was yellow. He hadn’t noticed. Too busy enjoying his well-earned retirement. His doctor told him he would die
Charles Cowling
Britain’s most bonkers tradition? The Straw Bear Festival   SCENE – A village wedding. Church bells. Assorted villagers have assembled at the lych gate waiting for a glimpse of the bride. They are joined by a TOURIST who happily happens to speak perfect English. VILLAGER: There she is! Just coming
Charles Cowling
  In an as-told-to piece in today’s Sunday Times, extreme expeditioner Ed Stafford describes the hardships he underwent when he was dumped naked on a desert island. He found the loneliness and isolation especially difficult to bear.  “My best technique for staying sane was something the Australian Aborigines taught me.
Charles Cowling
  In his new book, Levels of Life, Julian Barnes writes of the grief he felt, and still feels, following the death of his wife, Pat Kavanagh. It centres on: “the loss of shared vocabulary, of tropes, teases, short cuts, in-jokes, sillinesses, faux rebukes, amatory footnotes — all those obscure references
Charles Cowling
  Posted by Richard Rawlinson Not so long ago, The Independent’s left-wing young writer Johann Hari fell from being an award-winning media star when he was exposed as a self-promoting liar and cheat. The Economist was not convinced by his apology for plagiariasm.  It’s now the turn of right-wing, young digital