Charles Cowling

Rhoda Partridge took up painting when she was 70. Now 90 she’s still hard at it. Her spirited life has also embraced scuba diving, gliding and ceramics.

In an interview in this month’s Oldie magazine she is asked:

Do you find that after 70 years you live in the shadow of death?

She replies:

Oh pouf! Pocket full of crap! I think it could even be a good experience. We are beginning to be better about death, allowing people to die quietly, not to stick needles and drips in them. It’s important that the person who’s dying is allowed to die, that you hold their hand, tell them you love them and let them go. One of my sons has promised to look after me through my death. I would like all my children to come and talk to me one at a time. But I don’t want them all moaning around me.


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Shirley Tatum
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My favorite line in this gem of a quote: “I would like all my children to come and talk to me one at a time. But I don’t want them all moaning around me.”

I think family often misinterprets grief for love, that somehow it’s disrespectful not to stand around and moan. Rhoda’s sentiments should be on every door mantle of every hospice.

louise
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“Oh pouf! Pocket full of crap! I think it could even be a good experience”

love her!

Paul Hensby
Guest

Sounds like Rhoda has a sort of death plan, which My Last Song has been pushing. Indeed, its benefit for medical professionals to help patients talk about their end of life treatment resulted in a piece I wrote being on the BMJ website!
To help people understand the benefits of and content of a death plan, a template is now in the My Last Song Lifebox.
Nice posting Charles as always.