Charles Cowling
   Posted by Richard Rawlinson   From 7 Up in 1964 to 56 Up today, this remarkable documentary series has been filming the same group of people for a biblical seven days of their lives every seven years for almost five decades. Catch 56 Up on ITV at 9pm this
Charles Cowling
  Posted by Vale   150 years ago yesterday Henry David Thoreau died. I’ve loved him ever since I came across his views on the first transatlantic telegraph cable. Emerson had written in praise of it, but Thoreau – with something of the prophet in him  – refused to be
Charles Cowling
Posted by Vale A young girl went missing. A body was found. A young man went to the police and said that she might be his sister. They said that was not possible; her age is wrong. That was how it happened back in 1994. Today, police are looking for
Charles Cowling
  Posted by Vale One evening last month we lit some candles, sat by the fire with an old book of photographs and reminisced about my wife’s mother who had died just over ten years before. It was the first time we had done anything like this, but, over the
Charles Cowling
  We get quite a few emails here at the GFG from makers of ashes urns. Most of these urns are ghastly and get no more than a thanks but no thanks. We are unfailingly courteous. This morning was an exception. We received some stunning images from a Plymouth-based ceramist,
Charles Cowling
The Dead The dead are always looking down on us, they say, while we are putting on our shoes or making a sandwich, they are looking down through the glass-bottom boats of heaven as they row themselves slowly through eternity. They watch the tops of our heads moving below on
Charles Cowling
Sarah Walton, a potter of 35 years’ standing, whose work can be found in 13 museums in Britain, is a great favourite of the Good Funeral Guide. We admire and like her work enormously. Here, she tells us about her work: For years I’ve sold my Birdbaths as simply that.
Charles Cowling
A delightful post here from Tammi Thiele over at Escape to the Silent Cities. Tammi is a graveyard rabbit to her fingertips. She was married in a graveyard. Dressed in full Victorian mourning. On Hallowe’en. I’d never heard or read of grave houses before I came across this. They seem
Charles Cowling
Immortality and eternity have meaning as concepts but they don’t translate into reality, not here on transient Earth. If you don’t believe that, go and visit a mature cemetery – or ask Ozymandias, poor, baffled chap. Time teaches us this lesson every fleeting minute, but we set our faces against
Charles Cowling
Do not stand at my grave and weep;I am not there…Here’s an instruction more honoured in the breach than the observance. These, the opening lines of one of Britain’s favourite funeral poems, highlight the contradiction inherent in our complex psychological need to mark the spot where the body or ash