Charles Cowling
  A letter in last Thursday’s Times tells us something, perhaps, about the evolution of society’s thinking about dying, death, the competition for NHS resources, futile care and the declining value life holds for the ageing and the elderly both in the eyes of society and in their own eyes:
Charles Cowling
    Elderly people reflect on their reflections of themselves when young. Entitled ‘Reflections’, it is the work of Tom Hussey. Hat-tip to Caitlin Doughty, who posted a link to this on her Facebook page the other day.  Please note that here at the GFG we now post most of
Charles Cowling
Posted by Vale Here on the blog we often rail against society’s thoughtless pursuit of longevity. Rightly so – it is cowardice not kindness that endorses the suffering that medicine – seemingly without reflection or conscience – prolongs. But it’s important to remind ourselves that it isn’t always so; that
Charles Cowling
  From an article in last Sunday’s Sunday Times:  You may not be part of Britain’s 6.4m-strong army of carers yet, but if your parents are still alive, the dilemmas surrounding how to look after them as they get older will surely come. Future Identities, a government report published last week, drew attention
Charles Cowling
  Michael Wolff describes caring for his eldery, dementing mother in New York magazine. It’s a long piece and it will concentrate your mind. You’ll brood on it.  Warning: once you start, you won’t be able to put it down.  …what I feel most intensely when I sit by my
Charles Cowling
  72-year-old Liu Xianping modelling the new range for his granddaughter, Chinese fashion designer Lyu Ting. She says, “He picked up one piece and tried to give some advice on how to mix and match. We thought it was fun so we started shooting.” Liu says: “Modeling for the store is helping my
Charles Cowling
Image The British are some of the most charitable people on Earth — if you measure their charitableness according to how much money they fork out for good causes. Today marks BBC Children in Need Day. There will be the customary telethon, razzmatazz, fevered fundraising, spinning figures and, if all goes
Charles Cowling
  We didn’t cover the Dia de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead celebrations on 1 & 2 November. Perhaps that was an oversight. It’s a colourful and intriguing festival of great interest to Westerners. Those from cultures influenced by Protestantism tend to be a bit tongue-tied in their
Charles Cowling
  A theme that we like to explore on this blog is the way in which longevity has reconfigured the landscape of dying. The blessing of long life has its downside: protracted decline. We are likely to linger longer, much longer, than our forebears. There’s a physical cost in chronic
Charles Cowling
  It was the nineteenth-century Liberal politician and prime minister Willim Ewart Gladstone who famously said “Show me the manner in which a nation or community cares for its dead, and I will measure with mathematical exactness the tender sympathies of its peoples, their respect for the laws of the land