The Good Funeral Guide Blog

Take a nature lesson

Monday, 24 October 2011

 

Posted by Nicola Dela-Croix

 

 

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. 

Albert Einstein

 

 

It’s out there, everywhere, staring us in the face. You can’t miss it – the biggest clue to understanding the cycle of life and death, and all the triumph, tragedy, joy, sorrow, beauty and beastliness in the middle. It’s nature – not usually preceded by the words ‘the wonder of…’ for nothing. Every year, season, month, day, moment we see it in action; sunrise and sunset, fresh shoots and bare branches, new-borns and the not-so-lucky. She’s a harsh teacher, Mother Nature, but her lessons are beautiful. Immerse yourself daily – spring, summer, autumn, winter – she’ll repay you with a happy heart, clear head, contented spirit, uplifted soul and rosy cheeks.

 

 

And, as if that wasn’t enough, nature’s green and comforting fingers can reach out and heal grief… Read this.

 

 

 


3 comments on “Take a nature lesson

  1. Tuesday 25th October 2011 at 2:15 pm

    “Read this ‘here'”, so I did.
    Horatio Clare – yes sirree Bob.
    James

  2. Monday 24th October 2011 at 10:22 pm

    And on a similar theme: “The Magic of Reality” – Richard Dawkins’ latest book.

  3. Monday 24th October 2011 at 1:55 pm

    “…..for I have learned
    to look on nature, not as in the hour
    Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes
    The still, sad music of humanity,
    Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power
    To chasten and subdue. And I have felt
    A presence that disturbs me with the joy
    Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime
    Of something far more deeply interfused,
    Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns,
    And the round ocean and the living air,
    And the blue sky, and in the mind of man:
    A motion and a spirit, that impels
    All thinking things, all objects of all thoughts,
    And rolls through all things…
    Wordsworth

    We know nature is, from a certain angle, “red in tooth and claw,” we stand on Darwin’s shoulders now to look at i, as well as the utterly wonderful Sir David- but you’re in good company, CB – alongside Wordsworth here reaching out for the sense of unity with the natural world that calms us in the face of the years, the disasters and ecstasies, makes us feel part of something.

    Thanks for this, for reminding me to find space for it.

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